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people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
you think martin luther king would be saying about what has unfolded in detroit? >> well, i think obviously he would be very concerned. he would be outraged today that in america, black youth unemployment is close to 40% and real unemployment in this country is 14%. he talked about and led and moved toward that march on washington, that poor people's march at the time that he died, what he was talking about is an economy of full employment. massive investment in job creation and not just for african-americans. he was bringing together hispanics, poor whites and he was saying we have got to stand together and too often, ed, we forget about that aspect about martin luther king jr. and we simply focus on his enormously effective work in desegregating america. >> that day, what was the mood like? if you have to capture the emotion and memory about what that day was like, what would you say? >> enormous optimism, enormous excitement about the fact that so many people of all colors, of all ages came together in washington, d.c. that was unprecedented up until that point. the king speech
at that. oh, my god. >> that jungle cat is terrorizing residents in this neighborhood in detroit. >> like they don't have enough issues in detroit. >> it's unclear what breed it is or if it is a ferile cat. oh, that is scary. something gray -- gray and black marks and kids in the neighborhood say they are scared. >> i'm going to run, for one. i be scared to walk the neighborhood because it come out on you. it's not scared. >> it ran to me, so i ran. i ran in the house. it was real scary. i said i never going back there again. >> it looks like a cat with really long legs. >> yeah, large cat. >> studies show there are thousands of stray cats roaming detroit. the michigan humane society promises now to investigate. >> you know what works, moth balls. detroit really is reverting to its natural state, you know what i mean? wild animals roaming eating the population. >>> let's check in with janice dean with a look at the weather. >> i haven't spotted any stray cats around here. >> just large rats, new york. >> wow, those can be scary. absolutely. >> more rats than there are people. >> this big
a disproportionate impact on young in this country. i came back from a gathering in detroit, young people who are retail, fast food workers, who are demanding the minimum wage be lept forward to catch up with inflation because it's fall een woefully behind. these young people they see themselves as having absolutely nothing to lose in this economy. they're barely hanging on to the edge, working for $7.25. at rooms like rainbow, black, latino, white, asian, i'm sure there were native people in the room as well. the reality is they saw themselves as being on the same team. that team is people who in this economy, despite their brilliance, despite clear leadership potential h been relegated to margin and forced to survive on $7.25, which is something you can't do. i do believe this rising generation, more some than others because they're less tripped up on race, are willing to work together based on the common interest of kitchen table issues. you're seeing it with older people, too. we saw it with white union workers in 2012 throughout the midwest, for instance. so, i think there's reasons to b
've got to say, you cannot rob the people of detroit of the pension. they worked hard for these pensions. and let me tell you something, if we stand by what they take the detroit pension they will be taking our pensions. so don't think it will happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they will do it to us again. let me just tell you this. inequality is a scourge on our society. and yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour. we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979-2007, a period, although less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1%. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we've got to fight back at this. let me tell you, our economy is capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy could do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas, that just leaned on us a few months ago for the south korea the other said it will c
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
we created a rainy day fund. i bet detroit wishes we had done what we had done in those years. putting billions dollars aside. those are things i worked with the mayor on and i'm proud of. but i don't agree with the mayor on everything. two years ago when he wanted to lay off 4,100 school teachers, all of my democratic opponents, they opposed that, like i did, but i'm the person who got those layoffs stops, and more recently, when the mayor wanted to put in place a homeless policy that i think quite frankly was cruel, i stopped it from happening by going to court. so when i can agree and work with the mayor or anybody quite frankly, i'm going to do it. when i can't, i'm not going to. i think the idea of having a government where you have to agree all the time or never, we have a place like that. it's called washington. and nothing happens. >> kind of a boutique issue in new york with the carriage horses. overall, there's a group for everything. >> you have a carriage horse actually. >> yes, i do. anyhow, that's a different story. there's a group called quinn hates animals. so
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)